Tobacco by the Numbers

Tobacco use is the single most common cause of cancer mortality in the United States, making it the most preventable cause of death in our society.

  • In the United States, tobacco use is responsible for nearly 1 in 5 deaths; this equates to about 480,000 early deaths each year.1
  • The Tips From Former Smokers campaign motivated 1.6 million smokers to quit.2
  • Smoking cigarettes kills more Americans than alcohol, car accidents, suicide, AIDS, homicide and illegal drugs combined.3
  • Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death.4
  • On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers.4
  • In 2011, 7 in 10 adult cigarette smokers wanted to stop smoking.4
  • More than 4 in 10 adult cigarette smokers have made an attempt to quit in the past year.4
  • The tobacco industry spent 9.17$ billion on advertising and promotion of cigarettes or over $1 million every hour.4
  • Cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure remain the leading causes of preventable disease and premature death in the United States, resulting in approximately 443,000 deaths and $193 billion in direct healthcare expenditures and productivity losses in the United States each year.5
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References

  1. American Cancer Society. Tobacco-Related Cancers Fact Sheet. 2014. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/tobaccocancer/tobacco-related-cancer-fact-sheet
  2. The Lancet. Effect of the first federally funded US antismoking national media campaign. 2013 December 13. Retrieved from http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(13)61686-4/abstract
  3. American Cancer Society. What kinds of illness and death are caused by smoking cigarettes? 2014 February 20. Retrieved from http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/tobaccocancer/cigarettesmoking/cigarette-smoking-illness-and-death
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Fast Facts. 2015 April 15. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fast_facts/index.htm#use
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking-attributable mortality, years of potential life lost, and productivity losses—United States, 2000-2004. MMWR 2008; 57:1226-8.