SelfMade Health Network News


SelfMade Health Network Partners with Meharry Medical College to Combat Breast Cancer Disparities

Named one of SelfMade Health Network's Regional Resource Lead Organizations, Meharry Medical College leads the fight in eliminating breast cancer health disparities in African-American women in Tennessee.

HAMPTON, VA (September 15, 2016) – Reducing advanced stage female breast cancer is one of the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Healthy People 2020 national objectives; an initiative dedicated to improving the lives and health of all Americans. Although breast cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women, breast cancer mortality rates are the highest among African-American women, followed by Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women.(1)

SelfMade Health Network's Regional Resource Lead Organizations (RRLOs) are selected based on their ability to advance Healthy People 2020 objectives geographically and culturally to eliminate health disparities across adversely affected regions, states and counties. Meharry Medical College, the nation's oldest historically African-American medical colleges, has been tasked with serving Tennessee, where African-American women are disproportionately affected by breast cancer late-stage diagnosis and subsequent mortality rates.

Meharry Medical College's Vice President of Faculty Affairs and Development, and Family and Community Medicine Professor, Patricia Matthews-Juarez, Ph.D., has been actively working to create, promote, and sustain health equity for African-American and other underserved women across Tennessee and will act as a key member of this project.

Among the country's 25 largest cities, the breast cancer mortality disparity is highest in Memphis, Tennessee, where African-American women are twice as likely to lose their lives to breast cancer as Caucasian women.(2) Several critical factors associated with higher breast cancer mortality rates are lower median household income, as well as financial and geographical barriers to care.

Serving as a regional hub of engagement, training, dissemination, and community-clinical linkages, Meharry Medical College has taken on an important role to reduce breast cancer disparities among African-American women and low-resourced female populations. In collaboration with its partners, efforts are currently underway in seven priority Tennessee counties, including: Haywood, Williamson, Knox, Fayette, Lauderdale, Davidson (in Nashville), and Shelby (in Memphis) to address breast cancer screening, treatment and survivorship.

"The reduction of breast cancer mortality overall in Tennessee is our ultimate goal. We can achieve that by increasing awareness, as well as improved access to screening and culturally-relevant education. More black women are diagnosed with breast cancer in Nashville than Memphis, yet Memphis has higher mortality rates. We're focused on bringing both of those numbers down," Dr. Matthews-Juarez says.

Dr. Matthews-Juarez says, "Community engagement efforts are targeted toward increasing the number of African-American women in Tennessee who will change their breast screening-seeking behavior related to mammography services. While screening is not the total answer, it is an important step in the right direction for improving early detection and breast cancer control among African-American women."

Dwana "Dee" Calhoun, M.S., SelfMade Health Network Director adds, "We are excited about advancing health disparity efforts in Tennessee through this partnership with Meharry Medical College. It is a historic academic institution with a commitment to economically disadvantaged communities, not to mention one of the nation's top five major educators of African-American primary care physicians."

Dr. Matthews-Juarez adds, "As a RRLO, we are working to improve knowledge and awareness, especially among at-risk black women about early detection by engaging black breast cancer survivors in the priority counties, where too frequently breast cancer is diagnosed at later stages. We want to change the fact that our Tennessee women are dying at rates greater than the national and county averages."

"As we partner with the Health Disparities Research Center of Excellence at Meharry, we look forward to low-resourced women residing in cities and rural towns remaining physically active, as well as maintaining employment and living longer following an earlier breast cancer diagnosis. We are honored to team up with Meharry Medical College, who has continually demonstrated their commitment to exploring solutions to address the intergenerational cycle of breast cancer disparities among Tennessee grandmothers, mothers, sisters, daughters and wives," said Calhoun, M.S. says.

References:
(1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity, www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/race.htm
(2) White-Means, S., Rice, M., Dapremont, J., Davis, B., & Martin, J. (2016). African-American Women: Surviving Breast Cancer Mortality against the Highest Odds. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(1), 6. doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13010006

SelfMade Health Network Reaffirms Commitment to Local Organizations Focused on Tobacco Cessation Support

Network recognizes one year anniversary of its National SelfMade Health Network Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project pilot program.

HAMPTON, VA (September 12, 2016) – The total economic cost attributed to smoking alone has reached staggering rates. In fact, smoking costs have soared past $300 billion dollars a year, including approximately $170 billion dollars in direct medical care for adults.(1) Although, the overall adult smoking rate has declined to 16.8%, cigarette smoking prevalence is higher among uninsured adults (27.9%) and Medicaid enrollees (29.1%) compared to adults with private insurance (12.9%) and Medicare enrollees (12.5%).(2)

In an effort to expand tobacco cessation support to uninsured and underinsured populations, SelfMade Health Network launched the National SelfMade Health Network National Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project in 2015. The Project involved piloting and implementing the American Lung Association Assistors Project Toolkit, paired with complementary Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SelfMade Health Network resources in adversely affected regions, counties, and states. The Project also explored the experiences of uninsured consumers during the Marketplace enrollment process as they were linked to tobacco cessation resources and evidenced-based cessation counseling.

SelfMade Health Network identified disproportionate cigarette smoking rates in regions throughout the United States and initiated ten certified Marketplace enrollment partnerships in those areas. During Open Enrollment, the ten organizations incorporated brief cessation counseling for each person assisted during the process. Additionally, the awardees mobilized a myriad of nontraditional partners and strategies to advance the counseling effort. For example, some of the partnerships included working closely with homeless shelters, methadone clinics, food banks, and various faith-based organizations.

“As we mark the one year anniversary of this national project, we want to express our sincere appreciation for the vision, commitment and hard work exemplified by each of the ten selected organizations. Their innovative approaches have transformed the project into an evolving learning experience. We look forward to providing continued support to these stellar organizations. Our hope is that this incredible work serves as a model template for other like-minded organizations and communities working to improve tobacco cessation rates,” says Dwana “Dee” Calhoun, M.S., SelfMade Health Network Director.

The National SelfMade Health Network Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project awardees are:

1) Alcohol / Drug Council of North Carolina (North Carolina)
2) American Lung Association (West Virginia)
3) ACCESS Community Health & Research Center (Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services) (Michigan)
4) Crozer-Keystone Health System (Pennsylvania)
5) Johnson County Public Health (Iowa)
6) Harrisburg Area YMCA - Northern Dauphin County Branch (Pennsylvania)
7) Health Promotion Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Inc. (Pennsylvania)
8) Macoupin County Public Health Department in partnership with Maple Street Medical Clinic (Illinois)
9) Mississippi Primary Health Care Association, Inc. (Mississippi)
10) Oak Hill Baptist Church Ministries, Inc. Navigator Office (Mississippi)

SelfMade Health Network is a member of the CDC’s Consortium of National Networks to Impact Populations Experiencing Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities, focusing on populations with low socioeconomic status characteristics, including vulnerable, underserved and low-resourced populations, residing in rural, urban and frontier regions.

References:
(1) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Smoking & Tobacco Use-Fast Facts, www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/fast_facts/
(2) Ahmed Jamal, MBBS; David M. Homa, PhD; Erin O’Connor, MS, et al. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults — United States, 2005–2014. MMWR 2015;64:44[pgs.1233-1240].

SelfMade Health Network Announces Request for Proposals to Establish Regional Lead Organization to Support Southern Louisiana

National network expands commitment to addressing lung cancer disparities among rural populations

HAMPTON, VA (March 23, 2016) – As noted by the National Cancer Institute, “cancer health disparities” continue to exist among certain population groups and regions. These vulnerable population groups possess greater burden of disease and may be characterized by age, disability, education, race/ethnicity, geographic location, income, and gender.

SelfMade Health Network is a member of the CDC’s Consortium of National Networks to Impact Populations Experiencing Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities. The consortium of national networks is established to advance commercial tobacco use prevention and cancer prevention in populations experiencing tobacco-related and cancer health disparities. Specifically, the Network focuses on those populations with low socio-economic status characteristics including vulnerable, underserved and low-resourced populations residing in rural, urban and frontier regions.

As referenced in the Institute of Medicine report “Unequal Burden of Cancer: An Assessment of NIH Research and Programs for Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved” health disparities continue to exist across a number of disease categories and is associated with some of the nation’s leading costly conditions. “The establishment of a Louisiana Regional Resource Lead Organization (also known as Communities of Promise) represents a major next step in our national network’s commitment to addressing geographic-related disparities and would potentially spur capacity-building, as well as, opportunities associated with increased access for medically underserved areas, and other communities in parishes,” said Dwana “Dee” Calhoun, MS, Director of SelfMade Health Network.

SelfMade Health Network invites proposals for the Louisiana-Lung Cancer Prevention, Control and Survivorship with Business and Community Engagement funding opportunity. This RFP (Request for Proposals) is intended to establish a Regional Resource Lead Organization (RRLO) in Southern Louisiana encompassing public-private partnerships to increase lung cancer screening, early detection, treatment and survivorship. This RFP is also intended to increase tobacco cessation support primarily among male populations including: uninsured, low-income employees and/or unemployed adult tobacco users residing in primarily rural parishes and medically underserved areas.

Proposals are welcome from business groups, eligible universities, non-profit organizations, AHECs (Area Health Education Centers) and health system entities (including the Veteran’s Administration). A complete list of eligible entities is noted on the RFP. The geographic scope of this multi-year funding opportunity includes southwestern Louisiana parishes to include: Iberia, St. Mary, Evangeline, Acadia, St. Landry, Lafayette, St. Martin, Vermillion, Calcasieu and Cameron during the first two years with subsequent expansion statewide by the third year. Although preference shall be rendered to entities located in Louisiana as well as entities located outside the state are eligible to apply.

Recently established RRLOs vary by type. “We look forward to minimizing the onset of “late stage” cancers and reducing tobacco use among generations of vulnerable populations by expanding efforts to additional parishes in Louisiana and other states over the course of the next few years,” said Calhoun. Additional information pertaining to the Request for Proposals including a complete list of eligible entities, closing date and instructions for submission are posted on the SelfMade Health Network website here.

SelfMade Health Network Partners with University of Kentucky to Further Reduce Lung Cancer and Tobacco Use Disparities

National network expands commitment to improving the health of populations in the Appalachian Region.

HAMPTON, VA (March 11, 2016) – As referenced in Cancer Incidence in Appalachia (2004–2011), higher cancer incidence rates persist in a number of regions (including the Appalachia region) and appear to be caused by a convergence of multiple contributing factors. More specifically, geographic variations in cancer occurrence reflect differences in socioeconomic factors related to population demographics, health care access and utilization, and preventive screening behaviors as well as differences in environmental exposures and, in some instances, tobacco use. As a result, some populations and gender groups experience higher mortality and lower survival rates from cancer and generally do not possess the same overall health status.

SelfMade Health Network is a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Consortium of National Networks to Impact Populations Experiencing Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities. The consortium of national networks advances commercial tobacco use prevention and cancer prevention in populations experiencing tobacco-related and cancer health disparities. Specifically, the SelfMade Health Network focuses on those populations with low socioeconomic status characteristics residing in rural, urban, and frontier regions. The SelfMade Health Network recently selected the University of Kentucky (UK) College of Public Health in coordination with the Kentucky Cancer Program and the Kentucky Cancer Consortium as the newly designated Regional Resource Lead Organization to address lung cancer disparities in the Appalachia. Specifically, the UK-based Regional Resource Lead Organization team along with the Kentucky Cancer Program at the University of Louisville will lead efforts to increase early lung cancer screening, treatment, and survivorship. It also will lead strategic efforts to enhance tobacco cessation support chiefly among male populations, including uninsured, low-income employees and/or unemployed adult tobacco users residing in primarily rural and medically underserved areas.

"We are excited about this opportunity to address lung cancer disparities in Southern Kentucky with a particular focus on worksites with predominantly male employees,” said Regional Resource Lead Organization Principal Investigator Dr. Jennifer Knight, who is an assistant professor in UK College of Public Health Department of Health Management and Policy. “With the existing partnerships within the Kentucky Cancer Program, Kentucky Cancer Consortium, and UK College of Public Health, we are well-poised to make a difference by working with communities to develop, implement, and evaluate tailored interventions to positively impact the health of Southern Kentuckians."

This project contributes to the UK College of Public Health’s deep commitment to remedying the dramatic health disparities that burden Kentucky communities. “With among the highest rates of tobacco-related illnesses, including cancer, in the U.S., Kentucky must be a leader in the elimination of this deadly and costly disease that causes the suffering of so many,” said Dr. Nancy Schoenberg, Associate Dean for Research in the UK College of Public Health. “Dr. Knight’s partnerships and extensive community outreach will help foster a cultural shift toward health promotion. The UK College of Public Health is honored to be associated with this important program, one poised to make a difference in promoting health equity.”

The SelfMade Health Network Regional Resource Lead Organization’s primary role is to advance Healthy People 2020 Objectives from a geographic and culturally relevant perspective to eliminate health disparities across counties and subsequently states. The UK-based Regional Resource Lead Organization team will serve as the “Community Resource Hub” leading efforts targeting eight Kentucky counties, including Clay, Ohio, Warren, McCracken, Christian, Perry, Jackson, and Casey counties. This project will involve the coordinated efforts of the Kentucky Cancer Program East based at UK and the Kentucky Cancer Program West based at the University of Louisville to most effectively reach the target population in each county.

“We are honored that a well-respected institution with a rich history and reputation such as the University of Kentucky along with other organizations have committed to promoting cross-sector collaboration as we strive to address disparities. We look forward to creating a multi-generational shift among vulnerable, underserved and low-resourced populations resulting in the prevention of costly, life-altering and serious complications associated with Cancers and tobacco use,” said Dwana “Dee” Calhoun, MS, Director of the SelfMade Health Network.

SelfMade Health Network Launches New Website

The interactive website provides a wide-range of current resources through a “health equity lens” to support agencies, employers, and community networks nationwide focused on addressing tobacco use and cancer screening, treatment, and survivorship disparities.

HAMPTON, VA (January 11, 2016) – Health disparities continue to place avoidable expenditures on healthcare organizations, employers, communities, and government agencies. As part of its mission, SelfMade Health Network – a member of the consortium of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded national networks established to address cancer and tobacco-related disparities with a focus on vulnerable populations, has launched a new website.

“We understand the causes of health disparities are multifactorial, encompassing relevant factors including access to care, affordability of comprehensive health insurance and tobacco cessation coverage, disease-related factors, neighborhood or residential factors, fear of cancer diagnosis associated care costs, poverty and income levels, employment status, as well as literacy, patient and provider factors. As we continue to work toward reducing health disparities as reported in the landmark Heckler Report (developed by the Department of Health and Human Services), we are enthusiastic about joining others and creating a paradigm shift in tobacco cessation and cancer-related outcomes to conquer inequities, especially among our nation’s most underserved and low-resourced populations,” Director of SelfMade Health Network, Dwana “Dee” Calhoun, M.S. says.

The newly developed website, www.selfmadehealth.org, provides network members with current information, resources and promising practice models needed to improve the health of vulnerable populations nationwide. The website serves as one of SelfMade Health Network’s dissemination platforms providing a vast array of webinars and other tools developed through an equity lens for use among organizations, agencies, employers, academic institutions, healthcare delivery systems, and other major stakeholders throughout rural, metropolitan, and frontier regions nationwide to address health disparity gaps.

“Our hope is that our new website will serve as a catalyst for regional and local community transformation cultivated by the adoption of innovative and evidence-based approaches aimed at reducing late-stage cancers and tobacco use among vulnerable communities specifically those with low socioeconomic status characteristics. We view these populations as valuable members of society and hope the new SelfMade Health Network website becomes an essential resource for associations, networks, employers, agencies, policymakers, academic institutions, nonprofits, community-based organizations and faith-based organizations, as well as other stakeholders whose objectives are to make meaningful, geographically relevant and sustainable impact. These initiatives coupled with existing communication about current outcome-driven models and projects are designed to advance equitable access to and utilization of evidence-based resources for populations considered at a higher risk for tobacco use, as well as lung, colorectal, breast and cervical cancers,” Calhoun says.

The new SelfMade Health Network website features infographics, projects, toolkits, ongoing webinars, upcoming events, press releases and future funding opportunities for various sectors to address reducing health disparities. Organizations and associations are invited to join and learn more about becoming a network member or join the newsletter list to keep abreast of updates and newly released resources, throughout the year. The website is available in languages Spanish, Italian, Chinese and Tagalog.

SelfMade Health Network Announces Inaugural Members to its Leadership Council

HAMPTON, VA (December 9, 2015) – The SelfMade Health Network, a member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) consortium of national networks jointly funded by the CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) and Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) to address cancer and tobacco-related disparities, is pleased to announce its inaugural Leadership Council members. Through strategic partnerships, the SelfMade Health Network focuses its national efforts on reducing lung, breast and colorectal cancers as well as tobacco-related disparities among populations with low socioeconomic status (SES) characteristics including income, geography, education, occupation and health insurance status.

The new SelfMade Health Network Leadership Council members are:

  • Bruce Christiansen, PhD- University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health
  • David Coffman, MPA-Louisiana Food Bank Association
  • Kathy Danberry, MS, EdD- West Virginia Division of Tobacco Prevention
  • Colleen Delaney Eubanks, CAE- American Health Quality Association
  • Ed Giganti- Catholic Health Association of the United States
  • Leslie Van Horn- Virginia Federation of Food Banks
  • Stephenie K. Kennedy, EdD-West Virginia University, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center
  • Pat Matthews-Juarez, PhD- Meharry Medical College
  • Molly Meinbresse, MPH- National Health Care for the Homeless Council, Inc.
  • Beverly Morgan, LPN- National Federation of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs), Inc.
  • Tiffany J. Netters, MPA, PMP-Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI)
  • Amy E. Rettig, MSN, MALM, RN, ACNS-BC, PMHNP-BC, CBCN(R)- Academy of Oncology Nurses and Patient Navigators and Ohio State University & Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • Reina M. Sims, MSA- Ohio Commission on Minority Health
  • Robert Trachtenberg, MS – National Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Organization
  • David Zauche- Altarum Institute

The Leadership Council will serve in an advisory role for the Network. Leadership Council members include national, regional and local representation varying by industry sector, organization size, audience demographics and geographic region. Professionals come from a broad range of facilities including healthcare organizations, nonprofits, academic institutions, food bank associations, homeless councils, cancer centers, faith-based programs, state government, public health institutes and area health education centers. Members were selected for their ability to effectively impact underserved populations.

“As we strive to achieve the Healthy People 2020 national objectives, I’m excited to team with an array of well-respected experts and organizations committed to addressing gaps through innovative approaches to further reduce intergenerational disparities impacting the health and livelihood of vulnerable, underserved and low-resourced populations,” said Dwana “Dee” Calhoun MS, Director of the SelfMade Health Network.

Serving as advisors, members of the Network’s Leadership Council have an opportunity to shape future policies, develop promising practices as well as provide support for evidence-based models and projects by providing insight and recommendations setting the foundation for how private, public and community stakeholders can further reduce cancer and tobacco-use disparity gaps among vulnerable populations.

“We look forward to addressing and resolving cancer and tobacco-use disparity gaps by creating a paradigm shift where the infrastructure and capacity associated with tobacco prevention within more vulnerable communities is sustained and these populations no longer ‘suffer in silence’ from fears associated with a cancer diagnosis, costs associated with cancer screening, treatment and survivorship or other potential barriers,” says Calhoun.

In addition to selecting Leadership Council members, the SelfMade Health Network plans to extend invitations to additional organizations, associations and business groups nationwide interested in joining efforts as Core Members. Network membership criteria and responsibilities are posted on the Network’s website.

SelfMade Health Network Announces Ten Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project Grant Winners

SelfMade Health Network has awarded ten national, state and local organizations a grant aimed to reduce tobacco-related and cancer health disparities among vulnerable populations.

HAMPTON, VA (July 8, 2015) – The SelfMade Health Network, a national network geared to collaboratively promote tobacco cessation and cancer prevention in low socioeconomic status populations, is honored to announce ten award recipients for their National SelfMade Health Network Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project. In partnership with the American Lung Association, this multi-year project seeks to reduce tobacco use and lower cancer rates among vulnerable populations by matching patients with evidence-based health resources during their health insurance enrollment process.

As one of the newest members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) consortium of national networks, jointly funded by the Office on Smoking and Health (OSH) and Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC), SelfMade Health Network kicks off its mission-related efforts in the launch of the National SelfMade Health Network Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project. This national initiative involves integrating the American Lung Association (ALA) Assistors Project Toolkit throughout several geographical regions to further reduce some of the nation’s leading conditions associated with tobacco use. Using the ALA Toolkit, certified application counselor organization partners and other types of organizations will gain the resources and knowledge to directly connect clients to cancer prevention tools and tobacco cessation programs during the health insurance enrollment and plan selection process.

The National SelfMade Health Network Tobacco Cessation Marketplace Project awardees are:

  • Alcohol / Drug Council of North Carolina (North Carolina)
  • American Lung Association (West Virginia)
  • ACCESS Community Health & Research Center (Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services) (Michigan)
  • Crozer-Keystone Health System (Pennsylvania)
  • Johnson County Public Health (Iowa)
  • Harrisburg Area YMCA - Northern Dauphin County Branch (Pennsylvania)
  • Health Promotion Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania, Inc. (Pennsylvania)
  • Macoupin County Public Health Department in partnership with Maple Street Medical Clinic (Illinois)
  • Mississippi Primary Health Care Association, Inc. (Mississippi)
  • Oak Hill Baptist Church Ministries, Inc. Navigator Office (Mississippi)
“In addition to connecting individuals, families, low-income employees and other community members with vital resources to improve their health, this project addresses the Healthy People 2020 national objectives by engaging vulnerable populations and providing increased access and utilization opportunities through the delivery of evidence-based tobacco use screening and tobacco cessation treatment,”
       — said Dwana ‘Dee’ Calhoun, MS, CHES director of the SelfMade Health Network.

As noted in the The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014 significant disparities connected to tobacco use remain across racial/ethnic groups and among groups defined by socioeconomic status, educational level and region. Grantee organizations are representative of various regions across the U.S., including the Appalachian, Southern, Northeastern and Midwest areas and include government health departments, health systems, non-profit organizations, faith-based organizations and agencies, ensuring numerous disparate populations are serviced through this project.

 

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80% by 2018 Gains New Commitment by Tobacco Cessation/ Cancer Network and Patient-Centered Case Management Nonprofit

SelfMade Health Network and Patient Advocate Foundation stand with the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable in support of the 80% by 2018 pledge to help reduce colorectal cancer diagnoses and deaths.

HAMPTON, VA – Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, even though it can be detected early at a curable stage and prevented through detection and removal of precancerous polyps. To address this concern, the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) by American Cancer Society created the 80% by 2018 objective geared to raise the nation’s cancer screening rate to eighty percent by the year 2018.

The SelfMade Health Network, a national partnership geared to promote tobacco cessation and cancer prevention in low socioeconomic status (SES) populations, and Patient Advocate Foundation, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to helping seriously ill patients overcome healthcare barriers and operator of the SelfMade Health Network have signed the 80% by 2018 pledge and are committed to eliminating disparities in care. To achieve this goal, both organizations are dedicated to empowering communities, patients and health centers to raise awareness and coordinate efforts to embrace effective models for delivering quality colorectal screenings and continuum of care, empowering the patient each step of the way.

Those interested in learning more or joining the 80% by 2018 pledge should visit the NCCRT’s tools and resources page here: http://nccrt.org/tools/80-percent-by-2018/.

Patient Advocate Foundation is Awarded Grant by the Center of Disease Control and Prevention

PAF will seek to address anti-tobacco and cancer prevention challenges and opportunities courtesy of a five-year grant sponsored by the CDC.

HAMPTON, VA (September 29, 2014)Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF) – a national, award-winning nonprofit specializing in healthcare advocacy - is the proud recipient of a five-year anti-tobacco and cancer prevention grant awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The grant objective seeks to reduce tobacco use and lower cancer diagnoses in target-specific populations. Patient Advocate Foundation will be working alongside seven other networks forming the defined Consortium of National Networks to Impact Populations Experiencing Tobacco-Related and Cancer Health Disparities in order to achieve the grant goals and objectives. PAF will focus on enhancing the quality and performance of anti-tobacco and cancer prevention public health programs, services, partnerships, and resources in low socioeconomic status communities.

“Those with limited income, education, and occupation status are disproportionately at risk for cancer diagnosis, as it relates to tobacco use comparatively to other populations. We are honored to join forces with these seven other networks to truly make a difference in our national and local communities,” — says Alan Balch, CEO of PAF.

Additional grant recipient networks include National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, National Native Network, Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy & Leadership, National Alliance for Hispanic Health, LGBT HealthLink, National Council for Behavioral Health and the Geographic Health Equity Alliance. For more information about Patient Advocate Foundation and their mission to improve healthcare access to all patients, please visit www.patientadvocate.org or call toll free at (800) 532-5274.